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Hand & Arm


Standards for hand/arm protection:                                                                                                                                                                                    

Employers shall select and require employees to use appropriate hand protection when employees' hands are exposed to hazards such as those from skin absorption of harmful substances; severe cuts or lacerations; severe abrasions; punctures; chemical burns; thermal burns; and harmful temperature extremes.                                                                                                                                                                                        

General requirements

                                                                                                                                 

EN 420:2003 - General requirements for gloves

mark identifying the manufacturer

product identifying mark

#- size designation (normally in range 6 to 11)

- date of obsolescence (if appropriate)

#- dexterity performance in range 1 (lowest) to 5 (highest), if

required

markings specific to individual risks, including pictograms (Figs 1

to 13) where appropriate

Mechanical risks

EN 381-7:1999 - Requirements for chainsaw protective gloves

 

Note: Unless otherwise marked, only the left hand glove

will incorporate chainsaw protection and the following

markings.

as for EN 420, plus:

pictogram - for chainsaw use (Fig 10)

- A (5 finger glove without protection in the fingers), or

- B (glove or mitt also having protection on the back of

the fingers, but not the thumb)

#- chain speed class 0 to 4 (16 to 28 m/s in 4 m/s

increments) below the pictogram

- EN 381-7

 

EN 388:2003 - Protective gloves against mechanical risks

 

Mechanical properties

as for EN 420, plus:

pictogram - for mechanical risk (Fig 1), with four digits in a

horizontal line, in the order:

#- abrasion resistance (0 to 4)

#- blade cut resistance (0 to 5)

#- tear resistance (0 to 4)

#- puncture resistance (0 to 4)

(highest number = greatest resistance)

 

EN 1082-1:1997 - Protective clothing - Gloves and arm guards protecting against cuts and stabs by hand knives: Chain mail gloves and arm guards

pictogram - for impact cut resistance (Fig 2)

mark identifying the manufacturer

product identifying mark

# - size designation (normally in range 6 to 11)

maximum cleaning temperature if <82oC

EN 1082-2:2000 - Gloves and arm guards made of material other than chain mail

- size

- maximum cleaning temperature if <82oC

EN 14328:2005 - Gloves and armguards protecting against cuts by powered knives.

- size

- maximum cleaning temperature if below 82oC

- intended and forbidden applications

- constituent materials

Physical risks

EN 407:2004 - Protective gloves against thermal risks (heat and/or fire)

as for EN 420, plus:

pictogram - for thermal resistance (Fig 4), with six digits

in a horizontal line, in the order:

# - burning resistance

# - contact heat resistance

# - convective heat resistance

# - radiant heat resistance

# - resistance to small splashes of molten metal

# - resistance to large splashes of molten metal

each graded X, or 1 to 4. X denotes that this property has

not been tested. Higher numbers indicate higher

resistance.

EN 421:1994 - Protective gloves against ionising radiation and radioactive

contamination

as for EN 420, plus where appropriate:

pictogram - for radioactive risk (Fig 8)

# - 'lead equivalence' in mm

#- water vapour permeability (1 [most] to 5 [least])

#- ozone cracking resistance (1 [least] to 4 [most])

- any mechanical resistance as for EN 388

- any chemical resistance tested by EN 374-3

EN 511:1994 - Protective gloves against cold

Superseded by EN 511:2006

as for EN 420, plus

pictogram - for cold risk (Fig 6) with two or three digits in a

horizontal line in the order:

# - convective cold resistance (1 [least] to 4 [most])

# - contact cold resistance (1 [least] to 4 [most])

1 - water impermeability (if required)

EN 511:2006 – Protective gloves against cold

as for EN 420, plus

pictogram - for cold risk (Fig 6) with two or three digits in a

horizontal line in the order:

# - convective cold resistance (1 [least] to 4 [most])

# - contact cold resistance (1 [least] to 4 [most])

1 - water impermeability (if required)

EN 659:2003 - Protective gloves for firefighters

as for EN 420, plus pictogram (Fig.11):

EN 659 - implies the following performance levels

Mechanical properties

#- abrasion resistance >3

#- cut resistance >2

#- tear resistance >3

#- puncture resistance >3

Thermal properties

4 - burning resistance

#- convective heat resistance >3

# - radiant heat resistance (t24time of >18 s when tested

according to EN ISO 6942)

# - contact heat resistance (tttime of >10 s when tested

according to EN 702, wet and dry)

- heat resistant lining

Other properties

#- dexterity >1

- defined water permeability for waterproof layer

- water penetration resistance 1 – 4 optional

- integrity to water immersion optional

- liquid chemical penetration resistance optional

EN 12477:2001 – Protective gloves for welders

As for EN 420, plus:

A – Higher protection but lower dexterity

B – Lower protection but higher dexterity

EN 50237:2000 - Gloves and mitts with mechanical protection for electrical

purposes

Superseded by EN 60903:2003

symbol - for insulating protective equipment (Fig 9)

symbol - for mechanical protection (Fig 1)

- mark identifying the manufacturer

- category (see below)

#- size designation (normally in the range 6 to 11)

- class (see below)

- month and year of manufacture

Category

A - acid resistance

H - oil resistance

Z - ozone resistance

P - acid, oil and ozone resistance

C - extreme low temperature

Class

- marking / symbol colour code for material thickness:

00 (beige) (thinnest)

0 (red)

1 (white)

Service history

Panel on which date of first use, and dates of subsequent

inspection and test, can be marked

EN 60903:2003 - Gloves and mitts of insulating material for live working

symbol - for insulating protective equipment (Figs 1 & 9)

- mark identifying the manufacturer

#- size designation (normally in the range 6 to 11)

- month and year of manufacture

Category

A - acid resistance

H - oil resistance

Z - ozone resistance

R - all the above

C - resistance to low temperature

Class

- marking and/or symbol colour code:

00 (beige)

0 (red)

1 (white)

2 (yellow)

3 (green)

4 (orange) - depending on length of glove and

thickness of material (00 is shortest and thinnest)

Chemical/biological risks

EN 374-1:2003 - Protective gloves against chemicals and micro-organisms

As for EN 420 and EN 388, plus:

Gloves resisting

penetration and

permeation:

- Pictogram (Fig 4) with a minimum of 3 letters A to L

denoting which chemicals have been tested

Gloves resisting micro-

organisms:

must achieve performance level 2 in penetration

Note: does not infer protection against virus

Gloves resisting

penetration only (low

chemical hazards):

- Pictogram (Fig 12)

EN 455-1:2000 – Medical gloves for single use – Part 1: Requirements and testing for

freedom from holes

 

No specific marking requirement

 

EN 455-2:2000 – Medical gloves for single use – Part 2: Requirements and testing for

physical properties

 

No specific marking requirement

 

EN 455-3:2006 – Medical gloves for single use – Part 3: Requirements and testing for

biological evaluation

 

If glove contains latex, Fig 13. (May be on packaging)